Kara Maciel to Speak at HR in Hospitality Conference on Marijuana Laws

marijuana pictureOn March 6, 2018, Kara Maciel, Chair of Conn Maciel Carey’s Labor & Employment Practice Group will present at the HR in Hospitality Conference on the recent trend of medical and recreational marijuana laws.

As we have written about in the past, to date, 26 states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana, and eight states (plus D.C.) permit its recreational use.  As marijuana laws become more liberal and usage becomes more pervasive, employers must address the emergent issue of marijuana in the workplace and the legal implications of employee use. For example, must employers make accommodations for employees with valid marijuana prescriptions, allowing them to use the drug on the job?  At this session, Ms. Maciel will discuss solutions to these and other accommodation issues, with a look at recent court opinions.

The HR in Hospitality conference is a unique event where hundreds of human resources and labor relations professionals from hotels, resorts, restaurants, casinos, cruise lines come together to learn legal and practical guidance on issues specifically tailored to the hospitality industry!  To learn more about the conference and to register, click here.

 

 

Join Us for our May Webinar on Key Marijuana Issues in the Workplace

On Wednesday May 24, 2017, Conn Maciel Carey Labor & Employment attorneys Jordan B. Schwartz and Andrew J. Sommer will be presenting a free webinar discussing recurring marijuana issues in the workplace in light of new state legislation.

medical marijuanaThe rise in medical and recreational marijuana legislation poses many interesting questions for employers.  State legislation of the lawful use of cannabis likely will require employers to change their perceptions of longstanding drug policies and practices.  Legalized medical and recreational cannabis is a reality in many states, dispensaries are open for business, and state legislation on this topic has become a hot topic throughout the country.

Challenges by medical marijuana patients and recreational marijuana users concerning their employers’ practices are sure to arise, and there are several state and federal laws that may be implicated in those lawsuits.  Employers with national operations must take into account potentially divergent laws of the states in which they operate. This webinar will provide guidance to employers so they can tread carefully and refrain from making hasty decisions that can lead to the time, expense, distraction, and potentially unflattering publicity resulting from litigation.

 

The webinar begins at 1:00 pm ET.  You can register for the webinar HERE.  You can also register for Conn Maciel Carey’s entire 2017 Labor & Employment Webinar Series below:

Register me for the entire 2017 Labor & Employment Webinar series

Medical Marijuana and an Employer’s Rights in DC, Maryland, and Virginia

The District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia have all taken steps toward legalizing
marijuana in some form.  However, these laws differ in many respects and raise
some interesting questions for employers.  Because medical marijuana continues to be illegal under federal law, pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act, courts residing in jurisdictions where the use of medical marijuana is legal have found that an employer may maintain a drug-free workplace dreamstime_l_41623799 (1)and terminate an employee for failing a drug test.

While some states such as Arizona specifically provide protections for employees that have a valid prescription for medical marijuana, neither the District of Columbia, Maryland nor Virginia have such specific protections in their respective statutes.  The lingering questions is whether an employer’s decision to take an adverse action against an employee for using medical marijuana is protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) or a state’s disability discrimination statute, or under public policy.  To date, however, courts have ruled that, absent statutory protections, employers remain free to set their own drug policies and to discipline or terminate employees who violate those policies.

This article details the medical marijuana laws in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia, and addresses the current legal landscape regarding an employee’s use of medical marijuana and employment law.  Employers should evaluate their current drug policies, and continue to monitor the changing landscape surrounding the use of medical marijuana.  As some states do provide specific protections for employee’s use of Continue reading