The Final Overtime Rule Explained:  What Every Employer Must Do Next

By: Kara M. Maciel and Lindsay A. DiSalvo

shutterstock_losing moneyAfter receiving over 116,000 comments on its Proposed Rule to revise the version of the Defining and Delimiting the Exemptions for Executive, Administrative, Professional, Outside Sales and Computer Employees Rule (“Overtime Rule”) promulgated in 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) has issued a final, revised version of the Overtime Rule.  On September 24, 2019, the DOL announced the final Overtime Rule (“revised Overtime Rule”) through a press release touting the impact of the Rule and highlighting its major changes.  Notably, the press release reflects the significant impact the change in the threshold salary level for the white-collar exemptions is projected to have on employees – lowering the number of employees likely to become eligible for overtime pay from 4.2 million under the 2016 version of the Overtime Rule to 1.3 million.  This is due to the DOL decreasing the salary threshold level from $913.00 per week to $684.00 per week under the revised Overtime Rule.    

Significantly, the Rule takes effect on January 1, 2020 – in just under 100 days.  This timeline does not provide for a phase-in period as advocated for by many commenters and trade associations, and is a much shorter time period than 192 days employers were given in 2016 when the Overtime Rule was promulgated, and the 120 days given in 2004.  As justification for this timeline, the DOL stated that Continue reading

Pay Equity and EEO-1 Reporting Remain a Priority of Federal Regulators

Pay inequity, particularly compensation disparity based on sex, has become a very prominent political issue in the last decade and it looks like some additional changes could be on the horizon at the federal level.  Demshutterstock_532208329ocrats expressed that pay equity would be a priority in their labor agenda during the 2018 Congressional election cycle and, in February 2019, a proposal intended to further promote fair pay practices was reintroduced in Congress.   In addition, just last week, a federal judge lifted the stay on the changes to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (“EEOC”) EEO-1 Report.  The revised EEO-1 report would require certain employers to provide pay data by sex, race, and ethnicity to the EEOC, allowing it to more easily detect and track impermissible pay differentials.  Though at very different stages in their respective lawmaking processes, the proposed law and final regulation are very clearly intended to address pay inequality and provide additional enforcement tools.

Stay Lifted on EEO-1 Report

In August 2017, ahead of the 2018 submission deadline, the Office of Management and Budget (“OMB”) stayed collection of pay data based on race, ethnicity, and sex to allow it to review the regulation related to the lack of public opportunity to comment on the format of submission of the additional data and burden estimates related to the specific data file format provided.  However, on March 4, 2019, a Washington, D.C. federal judge ordered the stay be lifted because she determined that OMB’s decision was arbitrary and capricious – citing unexplained inconsistencies based on its prior approval of the rule and failure to adequately support its decision.  Continue reading