Expert Panelists Testify Before EEOC on “Revamping Workplace Culture to Prevent Harassment”

shutterstock_me tooOn October 31, 2018, roughly one year after the beginning of the #MeToo movement, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) held a public meeting at agency headquarters in Washington, D.C. entitled “Revamping Workplace Culture to Prevent Harassment.”  The purpose of this meeting was to hear various approaches that different industries are implementing to prevent harassment and provide employers the skills, resources, and knowledge to respond workplace harassment.

Acting Chair Victoria Lipnic began the meeting by noting that the nation is at the apex of a cultural awakening that the EEOC has been tracking for years.  Since the #MeToo movement went viral, hits on the EEOC website Continue reading

#MeToo and Workplace Harassment: A Letter to my Daughter

Dearest Daughter,

In October 2017, more than four dozen women stood up against workplace harassment by a man of power in the entertainment industry.  Then, the #MeToo Movement was born where people of all races, ages, backgrounds, and geographic regions, working in different industries, stood up and voiced that they too have been sexually harassed and/or sexually assaulted.  Unfortunately, these are not the first national headlines related to workplace harassment in the past several months and major companies have found themselves on the front page for not taking stronger steps to prevent and address complaints of harassment.

That this behavior is still occurring in the workplace in 2017 and has not prior garnered a national outcry is astonishing.  Just last year, the EEOC received a record level of 91,503 charges of discrimination filed with the agency.  My hope for you – my three year old daughter – is that you never will be someone who needs to say #MeToo.  However, if you do, and it happens in the workplace, let me give you some advice: Continue reading

Workplace Harassment 101

harassmentOne lesson companies of all sizes can learn from the sexual harassment claims that Uber is facing is that an employer needs to set clear restrictions on harassment and make a conscious effort to hold employees accountable to those workplace standards.  In particular, sexual harassment has been a significant issue in the workplace since men and women began working alongside each other.  However, it wasn’t until 1964, when Congress passed Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, that discrimination and harassment in the workplace was explicitly prohibited at the federal level.  Since then, several more anti-discrimination laws at both the state and federal level have been passed and countless judicial opinions denouncing unrestrained work culture and impermissible acts have been published.  So why is this still a hot button issue in the workplace over 50 years later?

Some may be of the opinion one complaint of workplace harassment is not a big deal because it is not reflective of the entire workforce or the values of the company generally.  While this may be true in some cases, it is important to investigate any such complaints because the root of the problem may be broader, such as Continue reading