Employment Law Update in D.C., Maryland, Virginia, and Illinois [Webinar Recording]

On March 24th, Daniel C. Deacon and Ashley D. Mitchell presented a webinar regarding an Employment Law Update in D.C., Maryland, Virginia, and Illinois.

CaptureThe District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia have enacted or are considering a host of changes that employers need to keep track of in 2021, such as revisions to discrimination laws, wage and hour laws, labor laws, and workplace safety and health regulations.

Illinois employers should be aware of an already existing minimum wage increase that takes effect in 2021, and there are a host of laws that took effect at various points in 2020. Indeed, in 2020, employers were faced with an expanded Illinois Human Rights Act that applies beyond the physical workplace, covers non-employee contractors and protects against discrimination based on perceived (in addition to actual) protected status. There were also special new rules enacted that apply to restaurants, bars and coffee shops, as well as disclosure requirements that will necessitate notifying the Department of Human Rights of adverse judgments in employment discrimination or harassment matters. Finally, the Victims’ Economic Security and Safety Act was amended and the signed “trailer bill” has clarified what employers should do if they wish to prohibit the use of marijuana as part of their workplace drug and alcohol policy.

Participants in this webinar learned: Continue reading

Employment Law Update in D.C., Maryland, Virginia, and Illinois [Webinar]

On Wednesday, March 24th at 1:00 P.M. EST, join Daniel C. Deacon and Ashley D. Mitchell for a webinar regarding an Employment Law Update in D.C., Maryland, Virginia, and Illinois.

CaptureThe District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia have enacted or are considering a host of changes that employers need to keep track of in 2021, such as revisions to discrimination laws, wage and hour laws, labor laws, and workplace safety and health regulations.

Illinois employers should be aware of an already existing minimum wage increase that takes effect in 2021, and there are a host of laws that took effect at various points in 2020. Indeed, in 2020, employers were faced with an expanded Illinois Human Rights Act that applies beyond the physical workplace, covers non-employee contractors and protects against discrimination based on perceived (in addition to actual) protected status. There were also special new rules enacted that apply to restaurants, bars and coffee shops, as well as disclosure requirements that will necessitate notifying the Department of Human Rights of adverse judgments in employment discrimination or harassment matters. Finally, the Victims’ Economic Security and Safety Act was amended and the signed “trailer bill” has clarified what employers should do if they wish to prohibit the use of marijuana as part of their workplace drug and alcohol policy.

Participants in this webinar will learn: Continue reading

Second Circuit Rules Title VII Bars Sexual Orientation Discrimination

shutterstock_gender diversityAlthough the Supreme Court has not taken up the issue and the status of sexual orientation discrimination remains uncertain, another Circuit Court of Appeals has now affirmatively ruled on the issue.  In a 10-3 en banc decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit recently ruled in Zarda v. Altitude Express, No. 15-3775 (2d Cir. 2018) that Title VII of the U.S. Civil Rights Act prohibits sexual orientation discrimination.

The Second Circuit’s decision deepens the existing circuit split on Continue reading

The Office Holiday Party: Best Practices to Avoid Legal Trouble

shutterstock_holiday party glassesThe holiday season is here, and employees are looking forward to celebrating with their family and co-workers.  However, the office holiday party – an anticipated yearly tradition in many workplaces – has now become a cause for concern for employers, especially amidst the current national conversation about workplace sexual harassment.

What is the result?  Many companies are cancelling holiday party plans, or hosting alternative parties with less alcohol and more day light.

There is certainly nothing wrong with hosting a holiday party, and employers should not be discouraged from doing so.  Hosting a holiday party for your employees is beneficial, as it helps boost employee morale and demonstrates Continue reading

Workplace Harassment 101

harassmentOne lesson companies of all sizes can learn from the sexual harassment claims that Uber is facing is that an employer needs to set clear restrictions on harassment and make a conscious effort to hold employees accountable to those workplace standards.  In particular, sexual harassment has been a significant issue in the workplace since men and women began working alongside each other.  However, it wasn’t until 1964, when Congress passed Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, that discrimination and harassment in the workplace was explicitly prohibited at the federal level.  Since then, several more anti-discrimination laws at both the state and federal level have been passed and countless judicial opinions denouncing unrestrained work culture and impermissible acts have been published.  So why is this still a hot button issue in the workplace over 50 years later?

Some may be of the opinion one complaint of workplace harassment is not a big deal because it is not reflective of the entire workforce or the values of the company generally.  While this may be true in some cases, it is important to investigate any such complaints because the root of the problem may be broader, such as Continue reading

EEOC and State Legislatures Focus on Pay Equity and Transparency

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If there is one issue that has remained a hot topic in employment news throughout 2016, it is pay equity and transparency.  These topics have not only garnered attention at the federal level but at the state level as well.

The EEOC proposed significant changes to the EEO-1 report, a mandated compliance survey containing employment data, where it will begin collecting pay data based on certain demographic criteria in 2017.  Additionally, many states, including Maryland, are taking their own steps to ensure pay equity in the workplace.  These laws will likely trigger significant enforcement efforts by federal agencies and the states; thus, employers should be prepared to respond to investigations into their pay practices.  However, employers can take several steps to help limit potential liability over the next year.

New EEO-1 Report Requirements

In February 2016, the EEOC announced a major revision to the Employer Information Report (EEO-1) requiring all employers with more than Continue reading