California Opportunity to Work Act Spells Trouble for Employers

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California Assembly Bill (AB) 5, the Opportunity to Work Act, was recently approved by the California Assembly Committee on Labor and Employment in April 2017.  The Appropriations Committee postponed a hearing on the bill that was scheduled for May 3, 2017.  Given the strong industry opposition to this bill and its harmful impact on employers, it is likely that the Appropriations Committee is taking a closer look at the bill and the negative Continue reading

House Passes Amendment to Fair Labor Standards Act Permitting Private Sector Comp Time

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On May 2, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Working Family Flexibility Act of 2017 – a bill that would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) to permit private employees to take paid time off instead of receiving monetary overtime compensation when working more than 40 hours per week.  While uncertainty looms over the fate of the bill as it moves to the Senate, if the bill is passed and becomes law, it would be a major amendment to the FLSA.

Private sector employers must be vigilant of this bill as it progresses through Congress and be prepared to implement procedures to offer comp time instead of overtime wages, and establish a system to keep track of the amount of comp time employees accrue. Continue reading

Acosta Confirmed as Secretary of Labor

Department of LaborOn Thursday, April 27, 2017, Alexander Acosta was confirmed by the United States Senate to serve as the Secretary of Labor in the Trump Administration.  In this role, Acosta will oversee the federal department that develops and interprets labor regulations and investigates alleged violations of minimum wage, overtime, and workplace safety laws.  The Senate approved Acosta by a vote of 60-38, meaning there was some cross-party support, despite the party-line vote on Acosta’s nomination by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee.  This marks the fourth time Acosta has been confirmed by the Senate, including his prior positions in the Bush Administration.

During the Bush Administration, Acosta served as a member of the National Labor Relations Board for approximately 8 months.  In 2003, President Bush appointed him to the head of the United States Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division, a position which he maintained for about 2 years.  Thereafter, Acosta served as the United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida.  Most recently, Acosta filled the role of Dean for Florida International University School of Law, a role from which Acosta has said he would resign if he was confirmed as Secretary of Labor.  Continue reading

Kara Maciel to Speak at HR in Hospitality Conference

main_hosp.jpgThe annual HR in Hospitality Conference, which is a leading conference that has content tailored to meet HR professionals’ needs to stay up to day on the latest legal issues facing the hospitality industry, will be held in Las Vegas on March 27 – 29, 2017.

Kara Maciel, Chair of the Labor & Employment Practice, is pleased to be speaking on a panel with other industry experts to discuss the top “50 Legal Tips in 50 Minutes.”  The panel will occur on March 28, 2017 from 4-5 pm, and will discuss the new Trump Administration, and what legislative and regulatory policies will change, what policies cannot change, what policies may change, and what to expect at the state law level.

All HR professionals in the hospitality industry will benefit from this conference, and as a friend of Conn Maciel Carey, you can register with a $100.00 discount off registration by clicking here.

We hope to see you in Vegas!

Trump Taps Alex Acosta for New Department of Labor Secretary

Department of LaborAs readers of this blog are aware, President Trump originally chose Andrew Puzder, the CEO of CKE Holdings, the parent company of Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s, as his Secretary of Labor.  However, on February 15, 2017, one day prior to his confirmation hearing, Mr. Puzder withdrew his name from consideration amidst reports that he would not receive the required Senate votes necessary for confirmation based in part on allegations that he failed to pay workers overtime pay, condoned sexual harassment, and opposed legislative efforts to address those problems.  The next day, President Trump officially tapped former U.S. Attorney Alex Acosta for the position.  As Labor Secretary, Acosta will oversee the federal apparatus that investigates violations of minimum wage, overtime and workplace safety laws and regulations.

If confirmed, Acosta would be the first Hispanic member of President Trump’s cabinet.  Mr. Acosta has a strong background in public service.  After graduating from Harvard Law School, he clerked for Judge (now Supreme Court Justice) Samuel Alito on the Third Circuit Court of Appeals.  He has also served as a member of the National Labor Relations Board, head of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division (both of which he was appointed to by President George W. Bush), and U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida.  Most recently, Acosta served as Dean of the Florida International University School of Law.  Should he be confirmed, Acosta’s public and private experiences (he also practiced law at Kirkland & Ellis) should enable him to take into account numerous perspectives in his new role.

At this stage, Acosta’s views on various pressing issues at the Department of Labor — such as Continue reading

Exploring FLSA Section 7(i) — Can You Use it to Exempt Commissioned Employees from Overtime?

A common question we often get asked by our health and country club clients is whether their trainers, tennis and golf professionals, and other similar employees may be considered commissioned employees of “retail or service establishment,” and thus exempt from overtime pay pursuant tgolf-pro-shopo Section 7(i) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”).  The short answer is “probably yes,” but there are certain criteria that must be met to ensure compliance with the FLSA.

By way of background, the FLSA generally requires an employer to pay overtime to any non-exempt employee who works over 40 hours during a workweek.  However, as readers of this blog are likely already aware, certain “white collar” employees, such as executive, administrative, and professional employees, may be exempt from the FLSA’s overtime provisions.  The FLSA also exempts from overtime certain employees who are paid mostly on commissions rather than a salary basis.  Specifically, Section 7(i) of the FLSA creates an overtime exemption that applies when all three of the following conditions are met:

  1. The employee is employed by a retail or service establishment;
  2. The employee’s regular rate of pay exceeds one and one half times the minimum wage for every hour worked in a workweek in which any overtime hours are worked; and
  3. More than half of the employee’s total earnings in a “representative period” (of not less than one month) consists of commissions on goods or services.

Continue reading

Announcing our 2017 Labor & Employment Webinar Series

5b0ac5ef-4c7d-4ae7-9d4a-2a1cffe3a587During the last few years, employers have become accustomed to increased scrutiny and enforcement from various federal agencies, including the Department of Labor, Department of Justice and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. While it is anyone’s guess as to how proactive these agencies will be during the Trump administration, the fact remains that various complex local, state, and federal laws currently are in place designed to protect employees under a wide variety of circumstances. With employers in all industries scrambling to prepare for a changing workplace in the coming months/years, it is as important as ever to be prepared for what’s ahead from an employment law perspective.

Conn Maciel Carey’s 2017 Labor & Employment Webinar Series, hosted by the firm’s Labor & Employment Practice Group, is designed to give you the practical solutions to ensure you are running your business in a way that does not run afoul of the most important labor and employment laws facing our workforce today.

Click here for the full schedule and program descriptions. To register for individual webinars, click on the program titles below.

Register me for the entire
2017 Labor & Employment Webinar series

March 22nd
The DOL’s Major 2016 Regulatory Initiatives and how (and/or whether) those will be implemented in the coming year

April 19th
Key Employment Law Issues for Start-ups and other Small Business, including relevant California laws

May 24th
Recurring Marijuana Issues in the Workplace

June 8th
The Changing Landscape of Anti-Discrimination Laws and Workplace Policies in Light of the NLRB

July 11th
Multi- and Joint-Employers, Contractors and Temps

September 19th
The Impact of Workplace Violence as it relates to Employment Laws and OSHA

October 17th
Addressing Employee Complaints: Whistleblower/Retaliation Claims and OSHA Notices of Alleged Hazards

November 15th
Employment Agreements,
Restrictive Covenants and Trade Secrets