Conn Maciel Carey Welcomes Chicago Partner, Mark Trapp!

Mark M. Trapp (3)

Conn Maciel Carey LLP is pleased to announce that Mark M. Trapp, an attorney with extensive experience defending employers in a broad range of litigation before federal and state courts, the NLRB and other agencies, has joined the firm as a partner in its Labor & Employment Practice Group, in Chicago, Illinois.

 

Mr. Trapp joins the firm with seventeen years of experience, during which he has represented employers in all types of labor disputes, from union campaigns and collective bargaining to grievances and arbitrations. Mr. Trapp has defended employers before administrative agencies and in litigation brought under the ADA, ADEA, Title VII and other federal anti-discrimination laws. 

In addition, Mr. Trapp’s experience with multiemployer pension withdrawal liability has been recognized across the country and his articles on withdrawal liability and other labor and employment issues have been published in respected legal publications.

“I have worked with Mark for over a decade at various law firms, so I am excited that he has joined our boutique practice that focuses on positive client solutions and effective client service.  His unique knowledge of traditional labor issues and multi-employer pension disputes is unparalleled and he has proven to be a creative and out-of-the-box adviser when counseling clients,” Kara M. Maciel, Chair of the Labor & Employment Practice reported.  

Mr. Trapp said “I am thrilled to again have the opportunity to work with the top-notch legal professionals at Conn Maciel Carey.” According to Mr. Trapp, the expertise of a boutique firm focused on OSHA and other labor and employment matters “complements my experience handling labor and employment issues and provides a solid platform for my withdrawal liability practice. I look forward to helping strengthen the team’s ability to provide exceptional knowledge and insights to labor and employment clients, and expanding the firm’s presence in the Midwest.” 

Welcome to the firm, Mark!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Labor Unions Attempt to Use DOL and OSHA Enforcement as Organizing Tactic

By:  Kara M. Maciel, Eric J. Conn & Lindsay A. DiSalvo

As the private sector continues to see a decline in labor union membership among employees, labor unions are struggling to remain relevant and recruit new, dues-paying members.  Traditionally, when a labor union begins an organizing campaign at a workplace, the federal agency that is the typical focal point is the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”), whose purpose is to protect the right of workers to organize and to freely choose whether or not to be represented by a labor union.  Indeed, the NLRB is an intrinsic part of the election process, and the NLRB may also become involved in a union organizing campaign if, for instance, the union asserts that the employer has committed an unfair labor practice.  However, unions have also engaged with or depended on the regulations of other federal agencies as a tactic to gain leverage in organizing campaigns.  There are a number of ways a union may influence the outcome of an organizing campaign by using federal agencies, such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) or the Wage and Hour Division (“WHD”) of the Department of Labor (“DOL”), to persuade employees or put pressure on employers to concede to union representation.

Taking OSHA as an example, an inspection or the threat of an inspection can impact an organizing campaign in a manner favorable for the union.  The threat of making an OSHA complaint or of an OSHA inspection could put pressure on an employer to stand-down against a union’s organizing efforts, even if it does not believe a particular violative condition or safety hazard exists.  A safety complaint could spark an OSHA inspection and, with about 75% of OSHA inspections resulting in the issuance of at least one citation, the chances are high that the employer would have an OSHA enforcement action on its hands. Continue reading

DOL Takes Significant Step Forward in Rescinding Persuader Rule

4This week the Department of Labor (“DOL”) submitted a proposed rulemaking that would rescind the regulation commonly termed the “Persuader Rule” to the Office of Management and Budget’s Office of Information and Regulatory Transparency (“OIRA”) for review.  The DOL, through its Office of Labor-Management Standards (“OLMS”), promulgated the Persuader Rule during the last year of the Obama Administration and received vehement opposition from the employer community due to its impact on access to legal advice and counsel.  If OIRA approves the proposed rulemaking, the next step is for the DOL to publish it in the Federal Register for public review and comment.  The DOL will then consider and evaluate the comments it receives and decide how to proceed with the rulemaking.  Although the outcome is not guaranteed due to the pending comment process, this is an essential step toward eliminating the Persuader Rule.

As we discussed in a prior post, the Persuader Rule imposed stricter reporting requirements on employers under the Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959 (“LMRDA”).  Specifically, the rule aimed to close a loophole in the reporting requirements, known as the “advice exemption,” which permitted employers to hire a consultant solely for advice without making a related report.  Thus, in the past, the LMRDA required an employer to file a report if it hired a consultant to directly persuade employees on organizing or bargaining issues, but did not mandate an employer file a report if the consultant hired only used “indirect” persuasion, such as advising employers on what to say to employees.  With the Persuader Rule, however, the DOL has essentially eliminated the advice exemption as it now requires employers and their labor relations consultants, including outside attorneys, to report any activities by the consultants that could be construed as an attempt to “persuade” employees regarding their rights to organize and bargain.  Continue reading

Kara Maciel to Speak at HR in Hospitality Conference

main_hosp.jpgThe annual HR in Hospitality Conference, which is a leading conference that has content tailored to meet HR professionals’ needs to stay up to day on the latest legal issues facing the hospitality industry, will be held in Las Vegas on March 27 – 29, 2017.

Kara Maciel, Chair of the Labor & Employment Practice, is pleased to be speaking on a panel with other industry experts to discuss the top “50 Legal Tips in 50 Minutes.”  The panel will occur on March 28, 2017 from 4-5 pm, and will discuss the new Trump Administration, and what legislative and regulatory policies will change, what policies cannot change, what policies may change, and what to expect at the state law level.

All HR professionals in the hospitality industry will benefit from this conference, and as a friend of Conn Maciel Carey, you can register with a $100.00 discount off registration by clicking here.

We hope to see you in Vegas!

Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch Sides with Businesses on Labor Issues

gorsuch-imageOn February 1, 2017, President Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit in Denver, Colorado, to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court left by Antonin Scalia’s death in February 2016.  Indeed, since February 2016, the High Court has functioned with only eight members; four liberal Justices and four conservative Justices.  Therefore, the confirmation of a ninth Justice to fill the vacant position, and establish a majority conservative bench, is likely to have a substantial impact on the outcome of controversial issues brought before the Court.

Gorsuch was appointed to the Tenth Circuit by President George W. Bush in 2006.  Although he is considered a firm conservative, as was expected given President Trump’s public stance to fill the vacancy with a judge who embodies Scalia’s principles, he has garnered praise from both liberals and conservatives for his work as an appellate judge due to his reputation for conveying his ideas fluently and courteously.

A number of Democrats have already conveyed their opposition to Gorsuch’s nomination, which could prove problematic as he will need to win over some Democratic senators to get the 60 votes needed to clear procedural hurdles. Continue reading

Join us for a Briefing on the Impact of the Presidential Election on Employment Law and OSHA in 2017

5b0ac5ef-4c7d-4ae7-9d4a-2a1cffe3a587Newly elected President Trump will have a significant impact on shaping the executive agencies that impact employers, unions and the workplace in general, not to mention the fact that he may hand pick up to four new Supreme Court Justices. There is no doubt that legislation, regulation, and court cases during the Trump Administration will have lasting effects on employers in 2017 and beyond.

On February 20, 2017, Conn Maciel Carey’s Labor & Employment and OSHA attorneys will host an in-person briefing in its Washington, DC office to discuss the practical impact of the Trump Administration on the legal landscape in key areas for the workplace, including:

  • The effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act;
  • The rollback of regulation and former President Obama’s Executive Orders, including the Department of Labor’s overtime rule, the persuader rule, and OSHA’s anti-retaliation rule;
  • The National Labor Relations Board under Philip Miscimarra’s Chairmanship;
  • Anticipated court decisions from the Supreme Court, including whether employers can include class action waivers in arbitration agreements;
  • OSHA enforcement, regulatory and policy developments to expect during the Trump Administration’s inaugural year.

Networking will start at 8:30 am, and the briefing will last from 9:00 am – 10:30 at 5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 660.  To register for this complimentary briefing, please contact info@connmaciel.com.

We hope to see you there!

Announcing our 2017 Labor & Employment Webinar Series

5b0ac5ef-4c7d-4ae7-9d4a-2a1cffe3a587During the last few years, employers have become accustomed to increased scrutiny and enforcement from various federal agencies, including the Department of Labor, Department of Justice and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. While it is anyone’s guess as to how proactive these agencies will be during the Trump administration, the fact remains that various complex local, state, and federal laws currently are in place designed to protect employees under a wide variety of circumstances. With employers in all industries scrambling to prepare for a changing workplace in the coming months/years, it is as important as ever to be prepared for what’s ahead from an employment law perspective.

Conn Maciel Carey’s 2017 Labor & Employment Webinar Series, hosted by the firm’s Labor & Employment Practice Group, is designed to give you the practical solutions to ensure you are running your business in a way that does not run afoul of the most important labor and employment laws facing our workforce today.

Click here for the full schedule and program descriptions. To register for individual webinars, click on the program titles below.

Register me for the entire
2017 Labor & Employment Webinar series

March 22nd
The DOL’s Major 2016 Regulatory Initiatives and how (and/or whether) those will be implemented in the coming year

April 19th
Key Employment Law Issues for Start-ups and other Small Business, including relevant California laws

May 24th
Recurring Marijuana Issues in the Workplace

June 8th
The Changing Landscape of Anti-Discrimination Laws and Workplace Policies in Light of the NLRB

July 11th
Multi- and Joint-Employers, Contractors and Temps

September 19th
The Impact of Workplace Violence as it relates to Employment Laws and OSHA

October 17th
Addressing Employee Complaints: Whistleblower/Retaliation Claims and OSHA Notices of Alleged Hazards

November 15th
Employment Agreements,
Restrictive Covenants and Trade Secrets